Pages tagged "Author Ryan Suto"


The Danger of the Independent State Legislature Theory

Posted on What's New Ryan Suto on July 01, 2022
The Danger of the Independent State Legislature Theory

Yesterday at the end of its term, the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to hear the case Moore v. Harper, which involves a deceptively simple question that could have huge implications for voting rights and redistricting in the United States: What exactly is meant by the word “Legislature” in the “Elections Clause” and the “Pres­id­en­tial Elect­ors Clause” of the U.S. Constitution?

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This is What Nine Years Without the Voting Rights Act Looks Like

Posted on What's New Ryan Suto on June 23, 2022
This is What Nine Years Without the Voting Rights Act Looks Like

The Supreme Court claimed there was insufficient evidence of a racial gap in voter registration and turnout to justify upholding Section 4 of the VRA and allowing Section 5 of the Act to remain effective. Nine years later, we now have sufficient evidence.

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Want to fix our polarized politics? Fix how we vote

Posted on What's New Ryan Suto on May 27, 2022
Want to fix our polarized politics? Fix how we vote

Voters understand that political polarization threatens our country. This is what we can do about it.

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Fifty-Seven Years After Selma

Posted on What's New Ryan Suto on March 07, 2022
Fifty-Seven Years After Selma

The Voting Rights Act is intrinsically linked to the events surrounding Bloody Sunday, what preceded them, and what we as a nation should have learned from them. As time passes and as the efforts to repair the Act do not, we risk losing the lessons of Selma and the statutory activation of the 15th Amendment.

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At Its Own Summit for Democracy, the U.S. Was an Outlier. The Fair Representation Act Could Change That.

Posted on What's New Ryan Suto on December 15, 2021
At Its Own Summit for Democracy, the U.S. Was an Outlier. The Fair Representation Act Could Change That.

At a time when our own democratic system is struggling, the U.S. was a glaring outlier among the summit invitees in at least one way: the way we choose our lawmakers.

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