Pages tagged "Author arab spring series"


The Corollary to Moroccan Exceptionalism

Posted on What's New Arab Spring Series, Jais Mehaji on June 21, 2011

The Arab Spring movement continues to have an impact on nations across the Arab world. Now this remarkable time of change has touched Morocco, the region’s oldest monarchy. In a televised speech on June 18, King Mohammed VI once again set the kingdom apart from the rest of the region by announcing sweeping constitutional reforms whereby he would relinquish some of his powers, empowering a hitherto moribund parliamentary system and granting the prime minister more executive powers. As a citizen of Morocco and backer of the 47-year-old monarch’s reform proposals, I see them as a bold and shrewd move that underscores his commitment to Morocco’s democratization and meaningful transition to a constitutional monarchy.

Read more

Egypt Inching its way down to Democracy

Posted on What's New Arab Spring Series, Jais Mehaji on June 16, 2011

Although the Arab Spring movement started in Tunisia, as I discussed earlier this week, the overthrow of Hosni Mubarak in Egypt was the year’s most stunning development. As the most influential and populous nation in the Arab world, Egypt, both in times of war and peace, has often played a leadership role in the region. The political changes happening in Egypt will certainly reverberate strongly in the region. Now it is turning to the even-harder task of establishing an enduring democracy, which if successful, will set a standard for its neighbors.

Read more

Tunisia Moves towards Fair Elections

Posted on What's New Arab Spring Series, Jais Mehaji on June 09, 2011

This post examines the democratic prospects for post-revolutionary Tunisia, as its government delays election date to October.

Read more

Democratization and Conflict in the Arab World: Challenges, opportunities and dangers- We were there!

On May 4 , the United States Institute of Peace (USIP)in Washington, D.C. hosted an exceptional conference,  organized with Georgetown University, entitled “Democratization and Conflict in the Arab World: Challenges, opportunities and dangers”. The aim of the conference was “to offer concrete, policy-relevant insights that will be of benefit to political leaders in the Arab world, as well as to policy makers and activists in the United States working in the areas of human rights, democratic change and the rule of law”.  

Read more

Parity law adopted in Tunisia

Posted on What's New Arab Spring Series, Wael Abdel Hamid on April 21, 2011

After the political revolution that struck their country earlier this year, Tunisians are now experiencing a genuine revolution of the mind. In an earlier blog post, I worried about the length of time the Tunisian interim government was taking to implement key measures .However, recent developments have eased my fears considerably. 

Read more

Arab Spring of Nations: what's next? -- Yemen: Troubles despite serious negotiations

Posted on What's New Arab Spring Series, Wael Abdel Hamid on April 01, 2011

The Arab world is still in trouble. Revolutionary nations Tunisia and Egypt are struggling for a successful, peaceful and democratic transition. Other peoples, especially in Yemen, Jordan and Bahrain, are still fighting for change.  In a blog series introduced on March 22 , I am focusing on what's going on in Arab countries at the center of change.  

Read more

Arab Spring of Nations: what's next? -- Tunisia: between hope and political instability

Posted on What's New Arab Spring Series, Wael Abdel Hamid on March 25, 2011

The Arab world is still in trouble. Revolutionary nations Tunisia and Egypt are struggling for a successful, peaceful and democratic transition. Other peoples, especially in Yemen, Jordan and Bahrain, are still fighting for change.  In a blog series introduced on March 22 , I am focusing on what's going on in Arab countries at the center of change.   

Read more

Arab Spring of Nations: what's next? -- The Egyptian Paradox

Posted on What's New Arab Spring Series, Wael Abdel Hamid on March 22, 2011

The Arab world is still in trouble. Revolutionary nations Tunisia and Egypt are struggling for a successful, peaceful and democratic transition. Other peoples, especially in Yemen, Jordan and Bahrain, are still fighting for change. 

Read more

Egypt's parliamentary elections — The roots of a democracy in denial

Posted on What's New Arab Spring Series, Wael Abdel Hamid on January 18, 2011

In 2010, Egypt held parliamentary elections which were widely criticized at home and abroad as corrupt and anti-democratic. Of particular concern was the fate of the Muslim Brothers, who had risen to prominence as the main opposition party in the 2005 elections, only to be swept completely out of Parliament in 2010.This article makes a little overview of Egyptian institutions before analyzing the roots of the last Egyptian electoral crisis. 

Read more

← Previous  1  2

Join Us Today to Help Create a More Perfect Union