Voices & Choices

Ranked choice voting was also a winner of San Francisco’s special mayoral election

Ranked choice voting was also a winner of San Francisco’s special mayoral election

London Breed made history by becoming San Francisco’s first African-American woman mayor in June - the only female mayor in the 15 largest U.S. cities.

But Breed’s was not the only success story to come out of the special mayoral election. The election offers a compelling narrative for how ranked choice voting empowered voters, who effectively and efficiently used the more fair and democratic system to make their voices heard in a close race full of qualified candidates.

From the whopping 53 percent of registered voters who cast ballots - the highest in a mayoral race in 15 years - to the 90 percent of ballots still included in the eighth and final elimination round, the statistics tell a tale of victory for democratic elections.

The mayoral race, though most recent, is far from the first success story for ranked choice voting in San Francisco. Since its 2004 debut, ranked choice voting has continued to shine in city elections, bringing more voters to the polls to cast accurate ballots that increased the number of women and people of color in city government.

Don’t just take our word for it: look at the numbers.

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Illustration and infographic by Mikhaila Markham

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