Pages tagged "Research & analysis"


Look to Election Rules to Reverse Decline of Political Center

Posted on What's New by Sheahan Virgin on May 11, 2012

U.S. Senators Dick Lugar (R-IN), Olympia Snowe (R-ME), Ben Nelson (D-NE) and Kent Conrad (R-ND) share a history of bipartisan policymaking -- and the reality that they are leaving Congress. With its "the-rules-matter" perspective, FairVote explores the way in which our winner-take-all voting system disadvantages centrist candidates and discourages bipartisanship.

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Primaries Spotlight Sharp Decline in U.S. House Moderates

Posted on What's New by Sheahan Virgin on May 08, 2012

On April 24, two moderate Blue Dog Democrats, Tim Holden and Jason Altmire, lost in Pennsylvania's primary election. They are the latest examples of an accelerating  "no-more-moderates" trend within both major parties. But fair representation of the left, right and center is essential to the health of a democracy. Grounded in its unique the-rules-matter perspective, FairVote explores how winner-take-all voting rules today disadvantage candidates willing to seek bipartisan solutions to problems.

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Snowe-ball Effect: How the Loss of Yet another Congressional Moderate Makes the Case for Election Reform

Posted on What's New by Sheahan Virgin on April 24, 2012

The stunning decision by Olympia Snowe to retire is just the latest example in an alarming series of setbacks for the political center, which is vital to a functioning democracy. What is clear, is that we are living through a period of severe polarization and partisanship, which has had adverse effects on the ranks of moderate politicians. FairVote's unique analysis connects the political center's travails to our damaging winner-take-all election rules and discusses the way in which alternative voting systems could boost moderates like Snowe.

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The 2012 GOP Nomination Contest Affirms Value of New Rules

Posted on What's New by Sheahan Virgin on April 23, 2012

As the 2012 Republican nomination contest effectively ends, FairVote reviews how the Republican Party's new nomination rules improved the process and proposes how to make both major parties can make it better in 2016.

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Blame Game: NJ Governor Chris Christie Wrong to Fault RNC's Proportional Rules for Romney's Nomination Travails

Posted on What's New by Sheahan Virgin on February 28, 2012

According to Romney surrogate New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, the Republican National Committee’s new rules (which led to more states allocating delegates by proportional representation)—not Mitt Romney and his declining vote shares relative to 2008—are at fault for his candidate’s recent travails. Blaming the rules for one’s poor performance or failure to meet expectations is certainly not a novel political strategy, but Christie’s statement—as we will see—gets a lot wrong. Just ask his state’s voters, which now are far more likely to vote in a meaningful primary.

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Third Parties and the Spoiler Effect In the 2012 Election

Posted on What's New by The Non-majority Rule Desk, Joe Witte on February 28, 2012

As the 2012 presidential election approaches, it's clear that while many American voters are ready for a third party, America's election system is not.

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Debate Exclusion Harms Voters

Posted on What's New by Will Hix on June 23, 2011

The election of capable candidates is arguably the most direct impact that the citizenry can have in this process. Voters rely on the media to create accurate portrayals of each candidate and present a fair opportunity for credible candidates to make their case to their constituents. CNN failed to provide voters the opportunity to evaluate Governor Johnson, instead relying on opinion polls of dubious importance.

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Egypt Inching its way down to Democracy

Posted on What's New by Arab Spring Series, Jais Mehaji on June 16, 2011

Although the Arab Spring movement started in Tunisia, as I discussed earlier this week, the overthrow of Hosni Mubarak in Egypt was the year’s most stunning development. As the most influential and populous nation in the Arab world, Egypt, both in times of war and peace, has often played a leadership role in the region. The political changes happening in Egypt will certainly reverberate strongly in the region. Now it is turning to the even-harder task of establishing an enduring democracy, which if successful, will set a standard for its neighbors.

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The End of the Election Assistance Commission?

Posted on What's New by Dean Searcy, Nate Crippes on May 31, 2011

The future of the Election Assistance Commission, an independent bipartisan government agency tasked with making elections fair and accessible, is in question. Amid the intense debate in Washington over government spending, this small agency could be terminated, some of its tasks being relegated to the Federal Elections Commission, in order to save the taxpayers $14 million a year. In the United State House of Representatives, H.R. 672, a bill introduced by Rep. Gregg Harper (R-MS), seeks to terminate the EAC. The bill has made it through the Committee on House Administration along party lines, and will now move to the House for a vote. 

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Internet voting: If ever made secure, would it improve election turnout?

Posted on What's New by Loqmane Jamil on April 11, 2011

The phenomenon of low voter turnout is not new but has become worrisome by its recurrence. In the United States voters are turning out in smaller numbers each year in certain elections like primaries and choosing city leaders. With the advent of new technological means of communication be a means to fight against the disaffection toward politics so many Americans seem to feel? Some like internet voting, but it's not ready for governmental elections.

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