Pages tagged "Author Theodore Landsman"


Assessing Pennsylvania’s new congressional map: more compact, less skewed, mostly uncompetitive

Posted on What's New Theodore Landsman on February 20, 2018
Assessing Pennsylvania’s new congressional map: more compact, less skewed, mostly uncompetitive

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court on Feb. 19 released a new congressional map for the state, one that will be implemented before the 2018 elections.

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Beating single winner districts at their own game

Posted on What's New Theodore Landsman on January 29, 2018
Beating single winner districts at their own game

FiveThirtyEight released an interesting interactive map on gerrymandering in America, and it demonstrates how unfair and open to manipulation the single-winner district system really is.

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Big changes, major accomplishments for FairVote Research

Posted on What's New Theodore Landsman on December 27, 2017
Big changes, major accomplishments for FairVote Research

FairVote’s Research department, 2017 highlights. We produced several substantial reports, and found critical data for our allies in California, New Mexico, Massachusetts and elsewhere. We also said farewell to a few colleagues and welcomed a few more onto the team.

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New York’s proportional representation experiment demonstrates potential of fair representation

Posted on What's New Theodore Landsman, Jesse Docter on December 18, 2017
New York’s proportional representation experiment demonstrates potential of fair representation

The New York City Council is not known for its diversity of parties or spirited debate. Its current makeup is eight percent Republican and 92 percent Democratic. Most votes are taken behind closed doors and are nearly unanimous.

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Understanding the Trump effect in the wake of the 2017 election

Posted on What's New Theodore Landsman on November 15, 2017
Understanding the Trump effect in the wake of the 2017 election

A major issue FairVote encountered when deciding how to discuss the 2016 election was whether “Trump Effect” that is, the ways in which Trump realigned the electoral map along demographic and regional lines, as shown above, is representative of the new national environment.

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How delegate selection rules could impact the fate of the New York constitutional convention

Posted on What's New Theodore Landsman on November 07, 2017
How delegate selection rules could impact the fate of the New York constitutional convention

Today New Yorkers will vote on whether to hold a New York State Constitutional Convention, often referred to by the shorthand “con con.”

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How to Bring Accountability Back to the House of Representatives

Posted on What's New Theodore Landsman, Marie Lemieux on September 07, 2017
How to Bring Accountability Back to the House of Representatives

We are still more than a year away from the 2018 election. With both parties still regrouping in the aftermath of 2016, and deeply divided, it is an open question what the major issues, messages and scandals will be. However, there is one thing we can already say with near certainty. The number of seats won by each party's candidates will not track the number of votes they received.

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Evaluating the Efficiency Gap as a Measure of Proportionality and Competition

Posted on What's New Theodore Landsman on May 31, 2017
Evaluating the Efficiency Gap as a Measure of Proportionality and Competition

The “efficiency gap” was first proposed by Stephanopoulos and McGhee in a 2015 paper, and it has emerged as a way to prove evidence of bias that even defenders of distorted maps could not deny.

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Shifts in Incumbency Advantage in the US House

Posted on What's New Theodore Landsman on April 25, 2017
Shifts in Incumbency Advantage in the US House

Despite strong anti-establishment sentiment, which contributed to Donald Trump’s election and Bernie Sanders’ strong primary performance, more than 98% of U.S. House members won re-election in November. Not only were most incumbents re-elected, they were re-elected by significantly more comfortable margins than in 2014. The “incumbency bump” -- our measure of the strength of congressional incumbents -- rebounded from a 20-year low of 2.55% in 2014 to 3.2%. In other words, incumbents earned an average of 3.2 percentage points more of the vote than the partisanship of their district suggests they would earn.

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