Pages tagged "Author Jo McKeegan"


The Constitutional Right to Vote Blog: Bush v. Gore, Ten Years Later

Posted on What's New by Right To Vote Blog, Jo Mckeegan on December 14, 2010

Ten years ago, in December of 2000, the Supreme Court decided Bush v. Gore. The case remains one of the more dividing litmus tests in American politics.

Read more

Brennan Center article "Citizen's Guide to Redistricting" published

Posted on What's New by Jo Mckeegan on December 01, 2010

This 2010 edition is intended to not only serve as a guide to those already “in the know” such as academics and experts on emerging trends in gerrymandering, but also to introduce students, and policymakers to the variety of ways in which redistricting affects the day to day lives of citizens.

Read more

Election Day: A Reminder about the Urgent Need for a Constitutionally Protected Right to Vote

Posted on What's New by Jo Mckeegan on October 28, 2010

As part a proposal to revamp our current election procedures, we should expand the practice of same-day voter registration (also called Election Day Registration), which is now the law in several states, and the District of Columbia. Same day registration (SDR) allows voters to register the day they cast a ballot.  It has been known to increase voter turnout by as much as 12%.  

Read more

Gerrymandering, the film

Posted on What's New by Jo Mckeegan on October 21, 2010

Gerrymandering, (77 minutes, not rated), will be playing this Friday at the new West End Cinema in DC.  The film, which cites FairVote Executive Director Rob Richie and works closely with EndGerrymandering.com, is a nonpartisan look at redistricting efforts

Read more

The Constitutional Right to Vote Blog: Election Day 2010, the DOJ, and the Right to Vote

Posted on What's New by Jo Mckeegan on October 21, 2010

With Election Day just hours away, it is important that voters know of the resources available to them, in the event they witness something go wrong at the polls.  

Read more

Constitutional Right to Vote Blog: The Right to Vote- More Precious than a Bag of Chips

Posted on What's New by Jo Mckeegan on October 20, 2010

Prior to 2007 in Maryland, a person could have been disenfranchised for committing a variety of “infamous crimes” including the misdemeanor titled “unlawful operation of vending machines”.

Read more

The Constitutional Right to Vote Blog: What elections tell us about how we protect the vote

Posted on What's New by Jo Mckeegan on October 20, 2010

Without clear constitutional protections, each individual citizen’s right to have a vote cast properly on Election Day is not constitutionally ensured. Missteps can and should be avoided with proper investment, training and attention to the mechanics of our elections. Voter apathy could be at least partially addressed with better civic education, starting in schools, but continuing into adult life with resources like voter guides. Until voting becomes a specifically enumerated right, we can expect to see concerns continue.

Read more

Virginia Governor takes action to improve voting rights

Posted on What's New by Jo Mckeegan on September 28, 2010

 The process of removing the right to vote from a person convicted of a crime was invented by the Romans and dubbed “civil death”. It is a process that several states in America still implement today, grounded in the disturbing fact that the U.S. Constitution does not provide a citizenship right to vote. In most states, a person who has completed serving a felony conviction is allowed to register to vote. Other states restrict this right, and in a few remaining states like Virginia, this punishment is a lifelong ban unless a waiver is granted by the governor. Anyone moving into such a state with a past felony conviction will be breaking the law if they vote, even if coming from a state where they had full suffrage rights. 

Read more

Federal Election Integrity Act Coming to a House Vote

Posted on What's New by Jo Mckeegan on September 28, 2010

Even the most die-hard Yankee’s fan would see something wrong with Derek Jeter acting as umpire in a game he’s playing in as shortstop. HR 512, the Fair Election Integrity Act, is designed to prevent this in the context of American elections.   

Read more

Re-Registering to Vote After Moving Out of State

Posted on What's New by Jo Mckeegan on September 15, 2010

A practical question arose this afternoon: how long after you move should you change your voter registration? Obviously, a voter should be registered where s/he actually lives and gets mail, but when should the voter make the switch? Can you wait a week? A month? A year?

Read more

← Previous  1  2  3  Next →

Join Us Today to Help Create a More Perfect Union