RCV Ballot Design

CCD_Grid.jpgRCV Ballot Design

The most critical piece of voter education in an RCV election is the ballot itself and its instructions. As part of its project with the Ranked Choice Voting Resource Center and FairVote, the Center for Civic Design released a usability report describing best practices for ranked choice voting ballots. They include:

Although a variety of ballot styles exist, the most usable paper ballot option that allows voters to rank all candidates and can be read by existing optical scan voting systems is the grid layout, as shown in the sample contest shown at the top of this page.

Images of each of the ballots designed and tested by the Center for Civic Design may be viewed and downloaded here. The full report from the Center for Civic Design may be read online below (ballot design begins on page 44). 

https://app.box.com/embed/preview/l94sa9jpkvpgllkqur18y4rpszjw4a12?direction=ASC&theme=dark8005500

Ballots from Other Jurisdictions

The following ballots demonstrate a good approach to the use of optical scan ballots in RCV elections:

Cambridge, MA: 2001 School Committee

South Carolina: 2006 Republican Primary Overseas Ballot

Portland, ME: 2015 Mayor

Portland, ME: 2011 Mayor
This was Portland's first mayoral election and it attracted a large number of candidates; voters were permitted to rank all candidates.


The following ballots demonstrate approaches taken in other contexts and can be helpful for contrast or when considering special circumstances:

Minneapolis, MN: 2009 Mayor and City Council
Minneapolis was limited in 2009 to three rankings and listing each candidate's name three times due to older voting equipment.

Assumption Parish, LA: 2001 Judicial Election Overseas Ballot
Louisiana in 2001 hand counted RCV ballots for military and overseas voters, so voters ranked by writing numerals rather than filling in ovals.

Wicklow, Ireland: 2002 Dáil Éireann (Irish legislature)
Ireland hand-counts ballots in its multi-winner RCV elections, so voters ranked candidates by writing numerals rather than filling in ovals.

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