Press

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  • FairVote: Massachusetts Should Not Move to Appointed Senators

    • Posted: August 21, 2009
    • Categories: FairVote

    Sen. Edward M. Kennedy requested yesterday that the governor and state legislature of Massachusetts change the law to allow the governor to appoint a new U.S. senator should the senator need to vacate his seat. FairVote, a nonpartisan election reform organization, opposes such a change, and today reiterated its call for all U.S. Senators to be elected by the people they represent, as is true of every Member who has served in the U.S. House of Representatives.

  • Report: Widely Used Voting Machine Missed 0.4% of Ballots

    Proving the value of transparency and redundancy in ballot-counting, an independent rescanning of ballots cast in the May 5, 2009 elections in Aspen (CO) showed that the voting machines used for the initial vote count entirely missed 11 (0.4%) out of the 2,544 ballots cast. The ballots were initially counted with Pitkin County's Premier (formerly Diebold) AccuVote optical scan voting machines, one of the most widely used optical scanning systems in the country. The error was discovered when TrueBallot, Inc., employed under contract with the city of Aspen to re-tally the elections at a central location, rescanned all ballots using a commercial off-the-shelf scanner and discovered the erroneously disregarded 11 ballots. 

  • Martinez Resignation Highlights Need for Elections to Fill Senate Vacancies

    • Posted: August 7, 2009
    • Categories: FairVote

    Florida U.S. Senator Mel Martinez has announced that he will resign this fall, more than a year before the end of this term. Gov. Charlie Crist, a leading candidate for the seat, is now in the position to decide who will fill the office in the interim, with the expectation of a placeholder candidate who likely will be a weak representative for one of our largest states. 

  • E-Newsletter July 29, 2009

    Features:

    • Adam Fogel Testifies, Major Papers Back FairVote Reforms
    • Action and Endorsements for Instant Runoff Voting, National Popular Vote
    • Working from the Grassroots for Fair Representation
    • FairVote Staff and Interns: Some Fond Farewells
  • Primary Power to the People

    The parties should begin to debate a plan that includes traditional state-based nomination contests culminating in a final, decisive national primary.

  • FairVote's Adam Fogel Advises DC Council to Pass Election Reform

    Adam Fogel, director of FairVote's Right to Vote program, testified before the Washington, D.C. City Council's Committee on Government Operations and the Environment on Monday, June 13th in support of the Omnibus Election Reform Act of 2009. Fogel told the committee that this important bill lays the foundation for making the District's election laws among the most progressive in the country, giving the city the opportunity to serve as a shining example to rest of the nation.

  • E-Newsletter June 30, 2009

    Features:

    • Key wins for the right to vote
    • Instant runoff voting wins in court, national popular vote keeps gaining
    • Congressional redistricting reform and a big win for choice voting
    • Krist Novoselic’s big news splash
  • The Swing States of America

  • FairVote Applauds Introduction of FAIR Redistricting Reform Act

    • Posted: June 24, 2009
    • Categories: FairVote

    FairVote's executive director Rob Richie today joined Congressmen John Tanner (D-TN), Mike Castle (R-DE), Allen Boyd (D-FL) and leaders with Americans for Redistricting Reform for a Capitol Hill news conference announcing a renewed push for The Fairness and Independence in Redistricting (FAIR) Act.

  • New Jersey, Virginia and other States of Flux

    • Posted: June 11, 2009
    • Categories: FairVote

    The field is set for highly competitive gubernatorial elections this fall in Virginia and New Jersey. In handicapping the electoral prospects of the gubernatorial candidates, some of our smartest politicos are assuming that a state’s presidential results are a major indicator of who will lord over the statehouse. But looking at governors’ races through a presidential lens leads one into some dizzying territory where blue is red, red is blue, and the most conventional of wisdom dissolves in the face of indisputable data.