Ranked Choice Voting in States

FairVote tracks bills in state legislatures that move innovations such as ranked choice voting forward. You can use this tool from Open States to find out who your state legislators are and ask them to support these laws if they are still pending. Let us know how they respond. We also invite ranked choice voting supporters to connect in our Google Group, where activists are organizing at the local and state level to advance ranked choice voting in their communities.

Know of any reform legislation not listed here? Contact us!

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The following list and map summarize bills that would expand the use of ranked choice voting in the United States, organized by state. This list will be updated throughout 2017 as more bills are introduced.

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Arizona

  • HB2272: Establishes rules and procedures for ranked choice voting and specifications for election equipment.

Connecticut

  • HB 6153: Establishes ranked choice voting for federal, state, and municipal offices.
  • HB 5950: Creates a study of ranked choice voting.

Georgia

  • SB 32: Allows overseas voters to use ranked choice voting ballots in general, special, primary, and run-off elections. 

Hawaii

  • HB179/SB218: Establishes ranked choice voting for special elections for Congressional races and for the election of council members in counties.
  • SB824: Provides a ranked choice method of voting for all partisan primary elections, special elections, and nonpartisan general elections.

Illinois 

  • SB 780: Establishes ranked choice voting for the offices of the Governor, Lt. Governor, Attorney General, Secretary of State, Comptroller, and Treasurer. 
  • HB 2917: Allows local jurisdictions to adopt multi-winner ranked choice voting in resolving voting rights disputes.

Indiana

  • SB 529: Permits a municipality to implement ranked choice voting for all offices and permits a county to implement ranked choice voting for all offices.

Maryland 

  • HB 622: Establishes an interstate compact to use fair representation voting methods such as ranked choice voting for congressional elections.

Massachusetts

  • SD.485: Enables cities and towns to adopt ranked choice voting.

Missouri

  • SB 140: Establishes ranked choice voting for all local primary elections.
  • HB 856: Establishes ranked choice voting for all state & federal offices. 

New Jersey

  • A1762: Enables certain municipalities to adopt ranked choice voting.

New York

  • S3309: Requires ranked choice voting in all citywide primary elections in New York City.
  • S4110: Enacts the "NYC instant run-off voting act"; requires an instant run-off in any municipal election in New York City. 
  • H5752: Implements instant run-off voting for city-wide multi-candidate primary elections for the office of mayor, public advocate or comptroller.

Rhode Island

  • H5513: State: Implements RCV for statewide offices. 

Utah

  • HB 349: Establishes the use of RCV for multi-candidate primary & general elections.

Virginia

  • HB 2315: Establishes ranked choice voting for state and federal offices. This bill is no longer being considered, but supporters can contact the sponsor to thank them and ask that it be reintroduced next year.

Washington

  • HB 1800/SB 5267: Allows local jurisdictions to adopt multi-winner ranked choice voting in resolving voting rights disputes.
  • SB 5067: Allows local jurisdictions to adopt multi-winner ranked choice voting in resolving voting rights disputes.

Wyoming

  • SF112: Established a Condorcet method of voting using ranked ballots in primary and general elections.
  • HB 248: Establishes a committee that will research alternative electoral systems. This bill is no longer being considered, but supporters can contact the sponsor to thank them and ask that it be reintroduced next year.

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